American Business Women’s Day

Who Run the World? Girls.

Celebrating American Business Women's Day


Today we celebrate the incredible accomplishments that women have made in the world of business. September 22nd is a day to reflect on the impact made by millions of women in the workforce as well as a call for businesswomen of diverse occupations to collaborate and network.  Probably most importantly, it’s a day to elevate the voices of hard working women and the example they set for young girls all over this country. 


We sat down with a few of these exemplary women to show that it’s not always “a man’s world” and exactly why that is important:



Dez Stephens


Founder + CEO of Radiant Health Institutea prominent international professional coach certification + credentialing program for holistic life coaches, wellness coaches, and business coaches. RadiantCoaches.com



How has your experience as a woman impacted your experience as a person in the world of business? 

 

“As a female business owner, I allow my feminine side to shine. I harness empathy in my profession, allowing me to deeply care for my students and clients. I am not afraid of showing this side of myself. Previously in the corporate arena, I was working within linear and hierarchical systems that didn't feed my soul. I have learned how to feed it differently now by flexing my humanitarian muscles.” 


How do you go about prioritizing diversity and inclusion in the workplace? What are the keys to operating a company where everyone feels welcome and included?

 

“Welcoming is not intrinsically inclusive, so I make sure to both welcome and include. I have my values clearly stated on my website. I make sure to regularly have open dialogue with my team members about this vital component of our culture. I remain open to feedback while getting defensive. I make a deep commitment to my community about prioritizing diversity and inclusion.” 

 

What advice would you give to young women still dreaming about their big careers in the world of business? 

 

Start claiming what is yours. Stay out of the dreaming, hoping, wanting, and needing phases since this can keep you in "someday" limbo. Start requesting instead. Your desires are not random. They are calling you to step into them. 





Terry Vo

 

External Affairs Manager at Comcastwhere she is responsible for local government affairs and strategic community partnerships and investments.  Programs Terry currently manages include Internet Essentials, Lift Zones and Emergency Broadband Benefit.

 

How has your experience as a woman impacted your experience as a person in the world of business? 

 

“My experience as a woman in the world of business has been full of unique and challenging experiences. I have been asked to make tea for guests which was not part of my job description but expected. Soon after, I left that job. I have also been tapped when a colleague was out sick for an extended time to take over a project. This was a great opportunity to show my leadership skills and ensure a successful outcome.” 


How do you go about prioritizing diversity and inclusion in the workplace? What are the keys to operating a company where everyone feels welcome and included? 


With every opportunity and decision I have to make at work, I make sure and view it through the inclusive workplace model. 


I am the Co-Lead for the Women’s Network and this platform has allowed me several opportunities to build out a leadership team that is diverse and inclusive. We bring programming that reminds everyone that they don’t have to be to belong. A few keys to operating a company of inclusion means that everyone strives to demonstrate compassion, acts with intention, and commits to lifelong learning. 

 

What advice would you give to young women still dreaming about their big careers in the world of business? 

 

“My advice to young women dreaming about their big career in the world of business is to negotiate your starting salary.”





Adrianna Flax

 

Senior Director at Culture Shift Teama diversity, equity & inclusion and multicultural marketing firm. Adrianna works in leadership on the diversity, equity & inclusion (DEI) education and strategy division. They work with organizations that range from small local nonprofits to large, Fortune 500 companies in all industries as well as in higher education and government. She designs comprehensive DEI strategies that include learning and development, talent management, communications and organizational culture-building. Adrianna specializes in conscious conflict, where she helps organizations understand how to evolve and grow stronger through conflict.

 

How has your experience as a woman impacted your experience as a person in the world of business? 


“It’s hard to parse out my experience as a woman as it is deeply tied to my identity as a Latina, a Jewish person and a member of the LGBTQ+ community. I live at the intersections of each of these identities, which shapes my experiences. I have experienced microaggressions in the workplace based on various aspects of my identity, but I have also had my voice lifted and highly valued because of my unique perspective. I’ve had the opportunity to be a role model to young women of color entering the working world, which was both a joy and a tremendous responsibility.


If I can show them a powerful woman who is as comfortable leading as she is learning, who prioritizes inclusion and equity-building for other historically excluded people, and who recognizes the forces of a patriarchal culture while working every day to overcome it at work and outside of it – then I’m succeeding.”

 

How do you go about prioritizing diversity and inclusion in the workplace? What are the keys to operating a company where everyone feels welcome and included?

 

Working in the DEI space, people often perceive that inclusion is inherent in how we work. While that is somewhat true, intentionality is the key to creating a workplace reflective of our values. Creating a welcoming and inclusive culture starts before ever hiring someone. Companies have many opportunities to communicate their values on their website, in ads, in job postings and more. The hiring experience shows people what kind of culture they’re walking into. Does your interview panel reflect the diverse representation you strive for? Are you thinking of cultural differences as you onboard new hires? How do you demystify your organizational culture and norms for those just starting at your company? These are among the many questions that help lead to a strong, healthy culture where employees feel valued, customers are well-served and the company thrives.

 

What advice would you give to young women still dreaming about their big careers in the world of business? 

 

“Know that your potential is unlimited. What may be limited are the preconceptions and world view of others. It is not your responsibility to educate those with limiting beliefs. It is your responsibility to avoid adopting those beliefs yourself. It takes little searching to find incredible role models. Make meaningful connections with people you admire. Put yourself in positions where opportunity can find you. Know that your perspective is valuable. Your generation will continue to have a big impact on the business world. It is leaders who understand that who will be your greatest champions.”


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